APPLE LEADERSHIP AND LEARNING – 31/05/16

What?

Apple in Education

  • a number of examples how iPads and apps are being effectively used in the classroom to redefine learning
  • introduction to some very useful apps
  • iPads are a highly creative and flexible tool that, if used effectively, remove a lot of barriers to learning faced by a lot of students and enables freedom and collaboration
  • the benefits of having 1:1 in the classroom
  • iTunes U courses
  • Classroom app

Dr. Ruben Puentedura – SAMR: A leadership perspective

  • S: Substitution, A: Augmentation, M: Modification, R: Redefinition
  • SAMR seen as a strategy that connects the changes in teaching practice and the changes in technology.
  • Often used in a ladder format as it is safe, but does not need to be. Mix it up!
  • Different types of knowledge are required to successfully deliver each level.

  • Substitution: requires mostly TK – Technology Knowledge
  • Augmentation: requires TK, CK and PK.
  • Modification: requires knowledge of PCK, TPK and TCK – where the 2 areas of knowledge intersect.
  • Redefinition: requires TPCK – where technology, pedagogy and content knowledge intersect on a deep level.
  • TPCK is built by having a strong community of practice, having habitual conversations that focus on whats going on in the classroom, sharing ideas and collaborating. SAMR can provide the common language required for this to take place.
  • Work at S and A provides the groundwork for M and R to take place. Should not be undervalued.
  • 5 areas for which technology is used – social, mobility, visualisation, storytelling and gaming. Using 2-4 of these in you SAMR process has proven to be most effective.

Round table discussions:

  • Took us through a iTunes you course and activity using the Classroom app.
  • Teachers can manage the use of iPads through the classroom app. as well as complete assessment and marking. However this requires that the the devices are owned by the school and requires and Apple ID login.
  • iPad vs Chromebook debate/discussion. iPad much more creative a flexible.

Bruce Jepsen – Principal at Te Akau Ki Papamoa, pioneer 1:1 iPad e-learning school

  • The importance of having vision for your school. What do you want your school to look, sound and feel like? This need to drive your decision making
  • Do not look at reasons why you cannot achieve 1:1/your vision, be solutions orientated in your discussions
  • Rethink the way the budget is done – one teaching and learning budget, do not compartmentalise. We do not let money interfere with out vision.
  • Our limit as teachers is often the way that we ourselves have been educated. Difficult to break free from this.
  • Trailing iPads going home.

So what?

  • Currently in Science I am doing mostly S and A but am yet to do M and R. What areas of knowledge do I need to develop to best implement the SAMR model?
  • How can I redesign the curriculum to support this? Would it be best to work backwards – why are the students coming to Science Technology and what key learning should they be leaving with?
  • Would it be possible to trial 1:1 with iPads in my classroom and create a iTunes U course for the students to work through?
  • What limits does my own education bring to teaching and learning with technology?

Now what?

  • I want to design an iTunes U course for one of my units using the SAMR model. This is a good step towards creating a VLE.
    • research iTunes U courses already available and get some ideas for what is effective and ineffective.
    • Begin to build my own ready to implement in term 3.
    • Need to see if there is a way that I can get enough iPads to trial this with one of my classes. Ideally have 1:1
  • Do some more reading around SAMR and how it is being used.
  • Explore some apps for science that can support my iTunes U course.
  • Perhaps also explore with Workspaces on Hapara do see if that is suitable for a VLE. Are there any schools out there successfully using it already? Research.
Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies 
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I am in awe of the professional way you go about exploring e learning in the science lab. I know that St Margaret’s is using the SAMR model so I am wondering what they do at year 7- 8 level in science . Students do go to science in the lab so if you want I could try and get you in contact with one of the staff members. With a view to ipads 1:1 could they be using class ipads during tech or would you need the same devices in the lab for each class? I am thinking that this could be part of the future planning- STEM in the lab. Please ask if you need me to help in anyway as you work towards your personal goal.

– 31/05/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. thank you for sharing another interesting reflection. Nice that you have recognised where you are with SAMR and your next steps. Keep us posted on how you get on with your iTunes U course. Cheers Pete

– 16/06/2016

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PD – HOW TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE OUTCOMES FOR MĀORI, PASIFIKA AND MINORITIES … – 10/05/16

What?

This workshop was around how to significantly improve outcomes for Māori, Pasifika and minoritised (has been made to feel like the minority, does not have anything to do with numbers) students in our school community. It was grounded in evidence and practices that work in New Zealand school communities.

So what?

This workshop challenged me to critically review and evaluate my current practice and thinking. It urged me to consider what changes I could make to better improve the learning environment for Māori, Pasifika and minoritised students in my classroom and school. How do I identify minoritised students? or students who feel minoritised?

I am also challenged to consider if my practice is taking me down the deficit track, or if I am agentic (using power to make change) in my approach? How do I keep myself agentic?

The significance of whanaunatanga (relationships) to student achievement was also reiterated. I am challenged by this when I think about my unique setting as a Science Tech teacher where I have a large number of students over a very short amount of time. How can I best maintain and build an effective and authentic relationship with each of my students? Is there something that I could do at the beginning of every lesson to reconnect with each individual while keeping in mind the limited time that I have?

How to increase engagement with Māori, Pasifika and minoritised ākonga and whānau is also an area in which I gained some deeper insights. We were presented with these four categories – events, making connections, learning talk and systems and processes – as ways to increase engagement. I was challenged to restructure and reframe how we used each of these practices and what we want to achieve out of them. Meaningful change occurs when we engage with whānau and students around learning talk and systems and processes. This shares power and enables use to build connections between school and home life. This challenged me to think about how we can reframe events to use them as opportunities for learning talk and sharing systems and processes. For example, if a school was to hold a gala, situate this in a unit around financial literacy and get all the students running the gala. Parents are informed of how students are being assessed etc, and are encouraged to go to stalls asking questions (either their own or provided by the school) that support and encourage the development of their financial literacy.

Another example of this is Mutukaroa. The Mutukaroa programme is a process that fosters the active engagement of parents and whānau in learning partnerships and provides them with the tools and knowledge necessary to support the development of core skills in their children.

Ultimately this comes down to what is the difference between someone being INVOLVED vs ENGAGED. This really hit home for me and has challenged me to think about how I can be more agentic and focus on authentic engagement rather than involvement. Of course again I am challenged with my context of being a science tech teacher, so how can I do this in my classroom?

Here are some notes and here is the slideshow presentation.

Now what?

These are some next steps to take what I have learnt back into my school and classroom setting.

  • Have some peer observations done that focus around being my practice being deficit or agentic orientated.
  • Do some research around relationship building games that are quick and try some out in my classroom. Perhaps set up a new routine for how we start each science lesson that involves some relationship building or space to reconnect as a class.
  • To get whānau engaged over involved, perhaps I could, at the beginning of each cycle, ask the students if any of their parents are trained in any area of science and if they were willing to come into the science lab to share/show/help etc.
  • In any future events that I am apart of, making sure that I am aware which of my students will be there and if there parent are around perhaps strike up a meaningful conversation around their students learning and see if the are aware of the systems and processes in place. etc. Perhaps I should discuss if/how to do this with leadership or more experienced teachers.
  • Finally to take on board the 5 things a teacher needs to be and the 5 best ways to promote learning (see notes) that were shared with use. My first step in this regard will be to increase the amount of feedback and feed-forward that I give to ākonga that is NOT focussed on behaviour but rather learning orientated. Perhaps I could have an observation around this so that I have clear evidence of what I am doing.
Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Tamara Bell said:

Great summary of what was a really engaging hui, it was awesome to see and read how much you got out of the day and what learnings and next steps you have now identified. So much so, I copied lots of your notes to add to my own reflection on the same kaupapa! Ngā mihi nui 🙂 I really like the three step framework of What, So What and Now What to structure your thinking and ensure you are covering the reflection and next steps process, ka mau te wehi!

– 11/05/2016

PRIMARY PCT WORKSHOP 1 – 05/05/16

This was a PCT and Mentor Workshop day provided by Mau Ki Te Ako on the 5th April 2016.

This briefly went over the requirements (PTC’s) that need to met by a beginning teacher in order to gain your registration. It then went deeper into the Teaching as Inquiry (TAI) process and how it is implemented. We were able to share our inquiries with fellow teachers and discuss any tips, challenges or ideas. We were also able to share some resources that we found useful for teaching and learning.

I now have a clearer understanding of how I can ensure that I am meeting the PTC’s and the type of evidence I should be collecting and were best to store it. I also have a better insight into how to conduct my inquiry.

I came away deciding that I need to simplify my inquiry and develop a clearer outline as to where I am heading. Furthermore to find an effective way to document this – most likely through appraisal connector like I am already doing.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Thanks for posting. Yes maybe the next step is for you and me to get together and have a chat about where you T@I is sitting and what might need adjusting etc. Next week sometime? Cheers Pete

– 06/05/2016

NGĀI TŪĀHURIRI PD DAY – 05/05/16

On Monday the 18th of April I, along with other Cobham staff, attended a PD day at Tuahiwi Marae. The workshop was aimed at building cultural understanding about the marae, the Rūnanga history and their protocols. Cobham School is located within the Tuahiwi Education Rūnanga (tribal council) area.

The introductory workshops covered:

  • Basic Pōwhiri (welcoming) protocol
  • Ngāi Tahu and Ngāi Tūāhuriri history
  • Marae Visits – What will be expected when you bring tamariki to the marae
  • Understanding basic tikanga Māori specific to Ngāi Tūāhuriri

This workshop has given me an authentic insight and understanding of the identity, culture and language of the Māori people in the area. This is critical for me to have for the educational success of all learners and in particular our Māori learners. This has also inspired me further to develop authentic cultural inclusiveness in my classroom and in my school.

This was also a unique opportunity for me as an educator to connect with the Tuahiwi Rūnanga for the first time and to establish a foundation for developing a strong relationship with them which will in turn help the success of māori learners at Cobham.

Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.

3 COMMENTS

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Pleased to hear that the marae visit was a great experience for you. I felt the same way. Really good to be in a cultural space which is unique to New Zealand and unfamiliar to many Pakeha. A good follow up would be to come up with a set of actions which could help you to develop the authentic cultural inclusiveness you mentioned above. It would be useful for example, for you to know which students in the science cycle come from Māori backgrounds.The behavioural indicators in Tātaiako can also give you some guidelines for future actions. I will be interested to hear how you get on. Cheers Pete

– 06/05/2016

Tamara Bell said:

Ka mau te wehi! Great to hear you got so much from the experience. I agree with Pete and something that helps can be framing the learning and next steps against these three questions: What? (what happened…you have covered this nicely above) So what? (what did you learn, what critical thinking has occurred for you) What next? (what actions will I now execute as a result of this learning)

– 06/05/2016

Annie Bowker said:

I too loved my experience and to return to the marae in a different role. Not as a young school girl but as an educator. What I took from this day was the history of the area and how so much of how they lived was about sustainability. In your teaching position I would encourage you to include science learning experiences that meet Criteria 4. I have some ideas if you would like to plan a time to meet. The science learning hub as you know is an excellent resource.

– 10/05/2016

TECHNOLOGY INQUIRY PLAN 2016 – 03/05/16

Here is a link to our inquiry plan and diary. Cilck here.

This is a working document and is continually updated.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO in Science Tech help improve the delivery of curriculum and student outcomes? ,
To implement 2016 Technology Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO engage priority and target students in assessing themselves.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
12 – use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies 
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self

3 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

So this is where we really need to arrange for you to get to StAC to meet with someone in the science department and talk to them about their use of SOLO.

– 03/05/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Yes Annie, that would be fantastic. It would also be good to see how they are using device/technology in the science department.

– 04/05/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie Really interested in your inquiry into how SOLO might improve the delivery of the science curriculum. A couple of things: 1. I have spoken to a contact I have at STAC and she is happy for you to visit. I will email Vicki and set up a time on a Tuesday when you can visit STAC. 2. I suggest you put you name down in the Teaching as Inquiry Support Timetable doc and I can catch up with you over the next week or so and discuss where you are and what you might want to go. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 06/05/2016

USING ZAPTION – 11/04/16

I have been doing some research around different digital apps that I can use in the science curriculum and I came across Zaption.

Zaption…….’transforms video-based learning with interactive content and tools that engage learners, deepen understanding, and track progress. Teachers, trainers and instructional designers use Zaption to quickly add images, text, and questions to existing online videos. Share lessons with individuals to watch on their own, or watch together with Zaption Presenter. With Zaption’s Analytics, instructors get immediate feedback on how viewers interact with content and understand key concepts.’

I have trialled it with all my classes so far and the feedback has been very positive. The students have loved using this app and I find that they are very engaged with the learning. It also helps me with tracking each of my students as it gives me instant feedback on how they are going. I would highly recommend this to all teachers to give it a go! I am now looking at making more of my own Zaption videos to meet the needs of my lessons.

At the moment I am only on the free version which limits the amount of data that you get (you can only see how five students are tracking). For $8 a month you can upgrade and have access to all the settings which lets you track all of the students. Something that I will most likely do.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others

3 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I discovered Zaption at the 2015 library conference and one keynote speaker talked about libraries and maker spaces. I am not the digital expert who could use it. This shows you are using SAMR model in your lab classes. Do you need to get the dollars from the science budget? Great to see you matching this to the criteria. I especially like the idea of Zaption as being another alternative assessment tool.

– 11/04/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Thanks for your comment Annie. You could definitely use it, it is easier than you think. I would be happy to show you. I feel it would be appropriate to use the money from the science budget, that would be great.

– 12/04/2016

Tamara Bell said:

Agree – I am a huge fan of Zaption and it is great to hear you are using it in the science lab. Everytime I have seen it used the engagement and interaction from children increases a great deal so exciting stuff Veronica – karawhiua!

– 12/04/2016

DISCUSSION ABOUT MOVING TO A MLE – 11/04/16

I had an interesting discussion with Brian and Pauline about how as a school we are moving to MLE and what this would look like in the technology department. We discussed a number of ideas about how we could trial having a shared learning environment. Perhasps between Science and Hard Materials and also between Science and Sowing. We spoke about the areas in which out curriculum overlap and how combining classes for one or two lessons could be very beneficial for student learning. It would also provide and opportunity for us to learn from each other as teachers and perhaps lead to an enriched and integrated techonology curriculum. We also discussed how this could be a huge strength for having neighbouring technology blocks and is an advantage that we could exploit further.

What now?

We will give it some thought, do some research and perhaps this will form an inquiry which we could complete in the coming term. We would start off very simple by combining one or two lessons.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

An interesting point raised. Have any of you had an opportunity to visit schools to see how these work. It certainly could lead to further student choice as students have access to other areas for things such as fair testing, making models to show there understanding.

– 11/04/2016

Pauline Smythe said:

This has been a very valuable conversation and I’m already starting to think about the possible ways we could integrate the science and technology curricula, especially in the area of electronics. I have a couple of simple projects in mind that blend electronics and soft materials, using conductive thread to sew a simple circuit. Definitely keen to trial these in cycle 4 when Yr 7 students will arrive will in science already possessing the stitching skills needed from their time in fabric technology.

– 13/04/2016