TECHNOLOGY INQUIRY PLAN 2016 – 03/05/16

Here is a link to our inquiry plan and diary. Cilck here.

This is a working document and is continually updated.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO in Science Tech help improve the delivery of curriculum and student outcomes? ,
To implement 2016 Technology Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO engage priority and target students in assessing themselves.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
12 – use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies 
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self

3 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

So this is where we really need to arrange for you to get to StAC to meet with someone in the science department and talk to them about their use of SOLO.

– 03/05/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Yes Annie, that would be fantastic. It would also be good to see how they are using device/technology in the science department.

– 04/05/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie Really interested in your inquiry into how SOLO might improve the delivery of the science curriculum. A couple of things: 1. I have spoken to a contact I have at STAC and she is happy for you to visit. I will email Vicki and set up a time on a Tuesday when you can visit STAC. 2. I suggest you put you name down in the Teaching as Inquiry Support Timetable doc and I can catch up with you over the next week or so and discuss where you are and what you might want to go. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 06/05/2016

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USING ZAPTION – 11/04/16

I have been doing some research around different digital apps that I can use in the science curriculum and I came across Zaption.

Zaption…….’transforms video-based learning with interactive content and tools that engage learners, deepen understanding, and track progress. Teachers, trainers and instructional designers use Zaption to quickly add images, text, and questions to existing online videos. Share lessons with individuals to watch on their own, or watch together with Zaption Presenter. With Zaption’s Analytics, instructors get immediate feedback on how viewers interact with content and understand key concepts.’

I have trialled it with all my classes so far and the feedback has been very positive. The students have loved using this app and I find that they are very engaged with the learning. It also helps me with tracking each of my students as it gives me instant feedback on how they are going. I would highly recommend this to all teachers to give it a go! I am now looking at making more of my own Zaption videos to meet the needs of my lessons.

At the moment I am only on the free version which limits the amount of data that you get (you can only see how five students are tracking). For $8 a month you can upgrade and have access to all the settings which lets you track all of the students. Something that I will most likely do.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others

3 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I discovered Zaption at the 2015 library conference and one keynote speaker talked about libraries and maker spaces. I am not the digital expert who could use it. This shows you are using SAMR model in your lab classes. Do you need to get the dollars from the science budget? Great to see you matching this to the criteria. I especially like the idea of Zaption as being another alternative assessment tool.

– 11/04/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Thanks for your comment Annie. You could definitely use it, it is easier than you think. I would be happy to show you. I feel it would be appropriate to use the money from the science budget, that would be great.

– 12/04/2016

Tamara Bell said:

Agree – I am a huge fan of Zaption and it is great to hear you are using it in the science lab. Everytime I have seen it used the engagement and interaction from children increases a great deal so exciting stuff Veronica – karawhiua!

– 12/04/2016

DISCUSSION ABOUT MOVING TO A MLE – 11/04/16

I had an interesting discussion with Brian and Pauline about how as a school we are moving to MLE and what this would look like in the technology department. We discussed a number of ideas about how we could trial having a shared learning environment. Perhasps between Science and Hard Materials and also between Science and Sowing. We spoke about the areas in which out curriculum overlap and how combining classes for one or two lessons could be very beneficial for student learning. It would also provide and opportunity for us to learn from each other as teachers and perhaps lead to an enriched and integrated techonology curriculum. We also discussed how this could be a huge strength for having neighbouring technology blocks and is an advantage that we could exploit further.

What now?

We will give it some thought, do some research and perhaps this will form an inquiry which we could complete in the coming term. We would start off very simple by combining one or two lessons.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

An interesting point raised. Have any of you had an opportunity to visit schools to see how these work. It certainly could lead to further student choice as students have access to other areas for things such as fair testing, making models to show there understanding.

– 11/04/2016

Pauline Smythe said:

This has been a very valuable conversation and I’m already starting to think about the possible ways we could integrate the science and technology curricula, especially in the area of electronics. I have a couple of simple projects in mind that blend electronics and soft materials, using conductive thread to sew a simple circuit. Definitely keen to trial these in cycle 4 when Yr 7 students will arrive will in science already possessing the stitching skills needed from their time in fabric technology.

– 13/04/2016

DIGITAL INQUIRY PLAN – 06/04/16

My inquiry plan will follow the stages of the teaching as inquiry model:

1. Scanning – what stands out to me in the science learning environment and what do I notice about ākonga learning? Are students engaged? Those that aren’t, why? How can I create a better learning environment for them? What am I doing, or not doing, that hinders student engagement in learning or creating an inclusive learning environment?

2. Focusing – Formulating a questions, in this case, how can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?

3. Developing a hunch – In developing this questions I am going off a hunch that increasing the use of digital technologies will get students to be more engaged in the science lessons. I need to identify a group of priority learners on which I will focus my inquiry.

4. Learning – I will complete some research – readings, discussions with other teachers etc. – in order to gain deeper background knowledge to support my inquiry.

5. Taking action – I aim to trail a number of different methods in using digital technologies in the classroom and get student feedback, both formal and informal, on how they think it impacted on their learning.

6. Checking – maintaining a high level of expectation that my actions will make a difference for all learners and making sure that I am collecting sufficient and rigorous evidence around the impact of my actions.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Code of Ethics
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self

USING GOOGLE DOCS – 05/04/16

In the last tech cycle I got ākonga in my focus group to use google docs to record their learning during the lesson. I used two different approaches. The first one I created the document and saved it to their Tech Science folder. In the second approach I got ākonga to create the document and required headings etc themselves.

Successes for both approaches included increased engagement from ākonga, greater attention to what they were recording and it resulted in a clear record of their learning. An additional success for the getting ākonga to create their own document was that it enabled them to take more ownership of their learning and the freedom to choose the format of how they wanted to record their learning.

Challenges that were shared across both approaches included that not all students were very efficient at locating or creating the document in their tech science folder. Some students were slower to type than others and did not have the same level of digital literacy. Additional challenges for the second approach included that not all ākonga saved their document in the correct folder which meant that when I went to mark it I had to find it. Further, giving them the freedom to choose the format for recording their learning meant that when marking or leaving comments I have to respond to a diverse range of note taking which becomes more time consuming.

One of the biggest challenges is for me as a teacher going through and marking their work. This becomes very time consuming. Opening the documents and leaving comments can take some time. Perhaps it is not necessary for me to mark every piece of work that they do, but them how am I to ensure that they are completing the task to the desired level?

The next step would be fore me to use google docs in combination with other digital learning tools such as google forms or Hapara workspaces to see if this can provide a virtual learning hub that is both effective and efficient for learning and for monitoring/assessing and marking learning.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
7 – Promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others

1 COMMENT

Annie Bowker said:

I think you are right reflecting on other digital learning tools options. I am wondering if in fact arbs- assessment resource bank and digistore may be worth exploring. As you know I am familiar with these resources but not in the context of a digital workspace. Happy to share my ideas with you as you are the tech wizard. This is one of the on going challenges we have when it comes to students across a range of levels and digital literacy. Have you checked out any of the UDL sites- universal design for learning. If you were to use SOLO as you are could you have students do some of the self assessment. If you like we could perhaps arrange for you to meet a science teacher at StAC as they use SOLO across all curriculums.

– 05/04/2016

HUI WHAKATAU 2/03/2016

What:

I attended the hui whakatau, a meeting between teachers and ākonga and their whānau who identify as Māori. We began by introducing ourselves, either in Te Reo or in English, then we presented an overview of Māori student success at Cobham. This was followed by a discussion session where ākonga and whānau could share ideas about what would help them succeed at Cobham. The hui concluded with some shared kai.

So what:

I found that the Whānau Māori Hui was a valuable opportunity for whānau and ākonga to share with Cobham staff what they thought would help them to be successful at Cobham. This is vital as they know what is best to help ākonga to succeed as Māori and also gives them ownership over their (or their child’s) learning. It also helped establish, or build on, whanaungatanga and develop a sense of community between all parties. I was challenged by the low numbers that we had and made me question why that might be? It inspired me to think of how we could work towards strengthening the Māori/cultural community in the school in a way that is ākonga and whānau led.

Next steps:

Discuss with colleagues about what they got out of the hui and their understandings.

Apply to take on the Māori unit and begin to collect and implement some of the ideas that were shared at the hui.

Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
7 – Promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
2 – Relating to Others,
4 – Participating and Contributing

 

Comments:

Annie Bowker said:

Well done you for taking the step to build your professional kete by putting yourself forward to apply for the unit.It makes sense to have a staff member who is passionate about Māori learning as Māori. You are building relationships with both students and whanau through your kapa haka leadership. I also feel that someone from another cultural background other than Pakeha is able to relate to the idea’ of walking in someone else’s shoes . My past experiences also tell me that a North Islander ( sorry ) seems to have more understanding of the culture and tikanaga than we do . The indicators to date are, 1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement., the hui 2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community., kapa haka and the connections. 3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture., prior experience and a willingness to embrace the culture 4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed., your comments in your reflection. 5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,

– 22/03/2016     (Private)

KAPA HAKA – 22/03/16

What: Having on the shared role for organising Kapa haka, over the past three weeks I have been attending practices.

So what:

It is clear that ākonga have a huge amount of respect for Matua. It is a great example of how mana enhancing relationships and a culture of ako can be established amongst a large group of students. It is also clear that there is a high level of expectation placed on the students and they respond very well to this.

I was very impressed with the passion and skill of the students, especially the leaders. It is obvious that the student leaders take their responsibility very seriously and they do a fantastic job of teaching their fellow peers. This is a clear embodiment of a tuakana-teina relationship, where ākonga are learning from each other.

Overall I have learnt a lot from Matua and the way that he has brought to life the various concepts and competencies outlined in the Tātaiako and Ka Hikatia.

How can I best support and maintain this ‘classroom culture’ and how can enhance this in my own classroom?

Now what:

– Look if I can assign more responsibility/leadership roles in my science classes.

– Give students more time during the lesson to teach each other and to share what they already have know as well as what they have learnt.

Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
7 – Promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment.,
9 – Respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests and needs of individuals and groups of akonga.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
1 – Managing Self,
2 – Relating to Others,
3 – Thinking

2 COMMENTS

Ann Lane said:

This is an ideal opportunity for you to see in action the importance of positive leadership and how this impacts strongly when the right people are in the right places and how this makes a huge difference especially when we are endeavouring to raise maori achievement. This can be said for all students as well as Maori.

– 22/03/2016

Annie Bowker said:

23/3/16 Your reflections indicate clearly that you are familiar with the various concepts and competencies outlined in the Tātaiako and Ka Hikatia. Transferring this from kapa haka to the science lab is another example of how you have made connections- working with students in kapa kaka ( which is something many are passionate about and have made a choice to attend) to a curriculum area. Any avenues for getting to know our students is going to have positives. Matua undoubtedly holds mana with the students and as the science teacher you can too. Share with them the importance of science in a maori world and as you have reflected how can you transfer this idea of ‘high expectation’ and peer relationships to classes in the lab.

– 22/03/2016     (Private)