Strengthening Digital Technologies Hangarau Matihiko in the Curriculum

Tuesday 29th of August

Tim Bell and Hinerangi Edwards

What?

Consultation on the draft digital technologies curriculum. Asking for feedback etc

The industry needs diversity so that all clients needs are met.

Digital devices are important for humans, that is the goal. Those who understand humans and what they need will be the most successful.

 

What is needed to teach DT/HM?

  • Growth mindset
  • Learning from the children – ako
  • Positive attitude
  • Connect with students and other teachers
  • Resilience
  • Flexibility
  • Problem solving
  • Reflective practice
  • Time
  • Two key building blocks:
    • Digital technologies pedagogy
    • Computer experience
  • Teachers already bring a lot of the building blocks required

 

Search engines:

Algorithm

  • Eg. sequential search vs binary search
  • Phone book example – finding a number, finding a name.

Examples of algorithms

  • Poi
  • Pixels of a picture. csfieldguide.org  Interactive tools
    • Pixel viewer Task to students to colour in the giant picture and piece it together.

The curriculum

  • Māori and English is very similar. Māori is more horizontal and English is vertical.
  • Māori looks at the impact on their value and culture. This is something to consider for the English one.
  • Programme outcomes split up over year levels.

Components of a computational device:

  • Interation
  • Sequence
  • Selection
  • Input
  • Output
  • Store

IMG_4312

Picture of what a digital device actually is and what it does. Biggest field of research is the pink arrows – sociology, psychology etc.

Programming is trial and error – to design a programme that does what you would like it to do. But it is not always successful

So what?

Big point of the curriculum is to give the students a chance to explore what the subject area REALLY is. Not what they stereotypes say that it is. Women are on average better computer programmers than men. This goes against the stereotype. Many students are not exposed to the real idea of what digital technologies offers and thus base their opinions on the wrong assumptions. 

Does this new curriculum do this?

Now what?

Feedback in a survey – submission tinyurl.com/dt-hm-workshops

  • Progress outcomes should be levels.
  • Cultural impact for the English speaking to be considered as part of the learning areas. 

 

Criteria this relates to:

Practicing Teacher Criteria 

1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,

Cultral Competencies 

4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,

Code of Ethics 

2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,

Key Competencies

1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

 

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Cultural Festival

On Tuesday the 15th of August our kapahaka rōpu of about 80 students from all different cultures performed at the 2017 Cultural Festival. It was a big day with our dress rehearsal in the morning and the performance that same evening. The students were rather nervous during the rehearsal but the evening performance was incredible. It was amazing to see all our student’s hard work come to fruition while having a lot of fun!

I have really enjoyed working with the kapahaka students over the course of this year. I have learnt a lot from our kapahaka instructor and so have our ākonga. His passion and mana have really lifted our level of performance. I am happy that as a school we can provide an opportunity for all cultures to come together and learn about Māori tikanga and tradition. This is very important for us and our ākonga as we are part of a bicultural nation. Being involved in kapahaka has also helped build and maintain whanaungatanga with the ākonga, which is important when I only teach students for a short amount of time.

Link to Performance

IMG_4088 (1)


 

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
9 – Respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests, and needs of individuals and groups of akonga.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self

PD: Moving Beyond ‘Covering’ the Curriculum: Using sTc to Engage All Learners in Science/STEM education

What? 

2017 Graham Nuthall Annual Lecture

Presented by: Dr. Alberto Rodriguez

IMG_4029 (1)

As communities and nations, we will continue to experience unanticipated, and often unprecedented, challenges and opportunities. Finding the solutions and innovations for the future will require working in transdisciplinary ways, and strengthening the scientific and mathematical literacy of all members of society. This presentation highlights findings from several research projects informed by sTc, a transdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework for science/STEM education. The framework enables teachers and students to move away from just “covering” curriculum or memorizing facts and concepts. Instead, teachers and students engage in learning for understanding, using hands-on, minds-on, culturally and socially relevant science/STEM connected to everyday life and real-world issues. The primary goals of sTc teaching and learning are to enhance personal and collective agency in order to effect positive social change. In the presentation, several examples will be shared that illustrate how sTc has successfully been used to enable transdisciplinary and cross-cultural science/STEM education in preservice and in-service teacher education, as well as with elementary and high school students.

Dr. Rodriguez is the Mary Endres Chair in Elementary Education and Professor of Cross-Cultural Science Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Purdue University.  His research focuses on the use of sociotransformative constructivism (sTc) as a theoretical framework that merges critical cross-cultural education tenets (as a theory of social justice) with social constructivism (as a theory of learning). He is investigating how teachers can make their pedagogy and curriculum more culturally and socially relevant to all students, as well as how teachers can better integrate STEM across all curriculum subjects. Dr. Rodriguez is the PI of the 20/20 Vision for Transdisciplinary Cross-Cultural STEM Project, which brings together teacher education faculty from across all the curriculum areas to co-design cross-cultural and socially relevant integrated STEM modules.

Dr. Rodriguez is the recipient of the Innovations in Research on Diversity in Teacher Education Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA), Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education, 2017), and the Kappa Delta Pi – Teaching and Teacher Education Research Award from AERA in 2000.


Notes

sTc – sociotransformative constructivism
POE -Predict – Observe – Explain
 Teacher centered – magnetism blah blah blah

image1.jpeg

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Critical thinker in the middle
How to learn:
  • dialogic conversation
  • Metacognition
  • Authentic Activity
  • Reflexivity
Example activities: A scientist like me – digital quilt
A scientist like me – digital quilt
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Image (3)
image-41.jpeg
Higher expectations you need to provide more support.
BrainPop.com. Concept maps.
New challenges. Enrolment and attendance increased.
See how what they learn can help them in everyday life.
image-5.jpeg

So what?

School experiences wash out your teacher training experience. Kind of teacher you want to be vs the kind of teacher you are becoming. But into the culture of the school. Has this happened to me? How has the school culture impacted my philosophy of teaching?
This is why research has good ideas but no big impact because it is not able to break into the culture of a school.
Making the invisible visible in our learning spaces.
What does do well mean??
Key = critical thinkers?
Fall in love with the subject. Then they will do well in the subject area. Learning for understanding.
Content vs quality – which is more important. This is a juggling act. I know my personal philosophy is to go with quality deep learning over covering large amounts of content. What impact does high stakes assessment have on this? Is this detrimental to our students learning?

Now what?

I want to reflect on my teaching philosophy that I wrote during my teacher training and ask myself what is my current teaching philosophy and how has it changed? What kind of teacher am I becoming? Can I find any areas that I want to improve on? What are my blind spots?

Are my students falling in love with science? Do they feel inspired to pursue science as a subject area? From the feedback I have collected through surveys, the majority of the students are. Perhaps there is an opportunity here to delve deeper and conduct an inquiry around this.


 

Criteria this relates to:

Practicing Teacher Criteria

PTC 4 – demonstrate commitment to ongoing professional learning and development of personal professional practice

PTC 6 – conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme

PTC 12 – use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice

Cultural Competencies: 

1 – Wānanga: participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.

5 – Ako: Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,

Key Competencies

1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

Code of Ethics 

2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,

29/02/2016 – TEACHING AS INQUIRY PROCESS

Today we had a meeting with Tamara and Pete about the Teaching as Inquiry Process. We completed a jigsaw puzzle exercise around the spiral of inquiry. The different pieces covered where:

  • Scanning
  • Focusing
  • Developing
  • New Professional Learning
  • Taking Action
  • Checking

Reporting back is well summarised in the following document.

Key understandings:

  • Keep your inquiry small and focussed on a few priority learner
  • Do not try to solve/address ALL issues or concerns, again focus in on one area
  • Maintain a holistic approach in all areas, be careful to take in all considerations/influences when analysing data or completing testing etc.
  • It is important to take on a collaborative approach to teaching as inquiry

Next steps:

– Begin to narrow down my own teaching as inquiry beginning by identifying my small group of priority learners.

Research:

(2014) H. Timperly, L. Kaser & J. Halbert. A framework for transforming learning in schools: Innovation and the spiral of inquiry. Centre for Strategic Education Seminar Series Paper No. 234, April 2014

 

Criteria this relates to:

Practicing Teacher Criteria 

1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,

Cultral Competencies 

4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,

Code of Ethics 

2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,

Key Competencies

1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

03/11/16 – SUMMARY: SIR PAUL CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY

Participating in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been incredibly valuable in advancing my knowledge in what it means to teach good science to students and why it is incredibly important. What largely impacted me was teaching science for citizenship. That teaching our ākonga the skills to think like scientist and will enable them to engage critically with the world around them. This is very important in today’s society where we are constantly surrounded to media and advertising that is often conflicting or attempting to seduce us into their way of thinking. The ability to think and act like a scientist is also important in order to adapt to our every changing world and to open doors for innovation and problem solving. I believe this has powerful potential to impact society and the future of Aotearoa in a very positive way. Is the science curriculum doing this?

The academy also broke down the science in the NZC and provided effective and powerful ways of teaching science using the science capabilities –

  • gather and interpret data
  • use evidence
  • critique evidence
  • interpret representations and
  • engage with science

and the 5E’s

  • engage,
  • explore,
  • explain,
  • elaborate
  • and evaluate.

This has been the most valuable PD I have every been on.

I have attached my notes from the conference which go further into the many ideas presented.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I am so glad that finally, someone from Cobham has been able to attend. I also note the focus on Science Capabilities that is something that has not been looked at by Cobham staff- only self via TRCC Science Conference and working with Science advisors at the early stages of this component of the NZC. As we know thinking and working like a scientist is a life skill and it is hoped that this conference and our EOSecology thinking will bring our Cobham students into closer relationships, share experiences and be aware of the many opportunities for careers connected to science. Hopefully, with your new curriculum content, tudents will gain greater awareness of the way science has such a place in our world. Thanks for appreciating and valuing this opportunity to attend the Academy and to then apply what you experienced to Cobham. Annie

– 03/11/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Pleased to hear that your participation in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been a worthwhile experience for you. It is great that you have used some of your learning from the Academy to inform out programmes here at Cobham. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 14/11/2016

03/11/16 – SIR PETER CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY DAY ONE

What?

PD for science – the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy

So what?

– Emotional engagement is fundamental to learning, is this prevalent in the current curriculum? Use more narratives/story telling. Socio-science – solve community problems etc.

– Are science tech and classroom science reinforcing each other? Are students making connections?

– Not to criticise the way we are thinking but to realised that we can mould the way we are working. Do not call it a fixed mindset. How do I think about science and what it is? Furthermore what correct and incorrect stereotypes do staff and students have about science?

Now what?

– Reflect on how I was taught science and how it has influenced my understanding of what it is. Ask myself what I think a scientist looks like and should be able to do. Make sure that I mould my understanding to be correct so that I pass this on to students.

– Establish a lesson for students where they explore what science is, how scientists think and what they do to contribute to society. In a way ‘re-educate’ students on their concept of science and make sure we are all on the same page. (To make sure that I build up the right idea on what a scientist does I am to be sure to do some reading around the area, discuss with other science educators and perhaps survey other staff.)

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

1 COMMENT

Annie Bowker said:

How I love what you are thinking. Scientists are often stereotyped and as we know the teaching of science was based on text book and with little opportunity to test the theory or experience for yourself working like a scientist. I’d love you to meet Julia Aitken for Australia and how she changed science in a rural NSW high school. To build what a scientist actually does is just how we hope our Living Lab will go- we can bring in scientists from all areas. I think we endeavor to bring out the ‘ awe and wonder’ but we still have to transfer this from the lab to the classroom.

– 03/11/2016

06/09/16 – TERM 3 WEEK 6

Highlights

– Cultural festival performance. It was an incredible feeling seeing the Kapa Haka group perform at the Cultural Festival – both Raegan and I were very very proud of all of the students. It was so rewarding to see all their hard work and ours come to fruition in such an energetic and enjoyable performance. We have received so much great feedback from parents from their achievements which are great to hear.

– Getting feedback from my students. As this week marked the end of tech cycle 4 and the beginning of tech cycle 5 I sent out a google form to get some feedback from the students. I also got some of the groups to give written feedback in class. It was great to hear what the students had to say – both feedback and feedforward. I really like to hear their opinion and always aim to make the changes that they suggest (within reason of course!). Here is a link to the surveys. Yr 8. Yr 7. The downside is that just under half of the students from each year level have responded.

– Feedback about the use of A3 SOLO sheets. I was able to ask the students in my survey if they preferred using the SOLO sheets or the booklets. Of those who completed the survey almost all of them preferred the booklets – 10/14 in fact. Though this may not be an accurate representation. Perhaps I should only focus on getting more thorough feedback from a focus group. This would be something to look at doing for the cycle 5 tech group. It would also be worth adding into the survey a section asking them to justify their answer.

– Having John Key visit the classroom. It was exciting for both the students and myself to have John Key come through the science classroom and see what we were doing.

– One big highlight that I am becoming more and more aware of as the year goes on is that teaching every student in the school really helps with whanaungatanga or building relationships and feeling part of the school community. I feel very privileged that I can walk through the school and know most of the students by name, have a real conversation with them that builds on the relationship we already have and be greeted by many of the students. It also helps when I take on extracurricular activities such as sport or Kapa Haka as I already have a positive relationship with many of the students which is key to behaviour management and setting up a positive and successful learning environment. It is also a great feeling walking into any classroom at the school and seeing familiar faces! This is important because as a tech teacher you can feel a bit separated from the rest of the classrooms/homerooms.

Challenges

Feedback forms. The issue I found with this is that just under half of the students from each year level have completed the form. This means that I may not have a true representation of what the students think about my teaching and science tech. Perhaps next time I need to send out the form a week before the final week to make sure that it is completed before they leave for the next rotation. I have sent an email to the classroom teachers of this rotation to ask them to remind them about the form but they already are very busy and I completely understand if it is not their priority.

Both a challenge and a highlight

Starting a new tech cycle. Firstly this is a challenge for two reasons. One – I am often a bit sad to see some of the groups go as you begin to really get to know them and how the class operates – their strengths and weaknesses and what works for them and what doesn’t. By this time you have also built some great relationships with the class and this really helps the flow of the lessons. Two – it is challenging to get to know all the new students and their names and quickly form a connection with them. The highlights that come from this, however, is that as this is the 5th time I have done this year it is becoming easier and easier. I am finding that my confidence has grown a lot and I am able to establish positive working relationships with the classrooms quite quickly. I am also getting very good at learning names fast! 🙂

Next week

Hail articles for Marae Trip and Kapa Haka

– Review SOLO entry slips completed by all the new classes

– Analyse results from google survey

– Begin reports for cycle 4 classes

Personal goals this relates to:
To implement 2016 Technology Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO engage priority and target students in assessing themselves. ,
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.,
Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO in Science Tech help improve the delivery of curriculum and student outcomes?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

Thanks Ronnie for continuing to demonstrate above and beyond commitment to our students and your own on going professional learning and practice. By being honest in your reflection about the challenges you have had recently and particularly the survey and the findings. When use of SOLO is the Technology Inquiry I guess this makes this even more challenging. Do you think it maybe because in science the SOLO rubric is taking them to the limit of thinking based on their at times introduction to the science idea and understanding? I find that sometimes when we are ‘ pushing’ students out of their comfort zone they choose to want to revert back to what they feel safe using and doing.

Looks like you have another busy week ahead and good luck for Tuesday night with your kapa haka group. Annie

– 06/09/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Another thoughtful post. Lots of highlights for you in science but also in the extra curricula activities you are associated with. You have reason to be very proud of the kapa haka performance. I’m biased of course, but I thought the Cobham items were the highlight of the show. I would be interested in catching up with you sometime soon to talk about the A3 SOLO sheets and how they are going. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 09/09/2016