29/02/2016 – TEACHING AS INQUIRY PROCESS

Today we had a meeting with Tamara and Pete about the Teaching as Inquiry Process. We completed a jigsaw puzzle exercise around the spiral of inquiry. The different pieces covered where:

  • Scanning
  • Focusing
  • Developing
  • New Professional Learning
  • Taking Action
  • Checking

Reporting back is well summarised in the following document.

Key understandings:

  • Keep your inquiry small and focussed on a few priority learner
  • Do not try to solve/address ALL issues or concerns, again focus in on one area
  • Maintain a holistic approach in all areas, be careful to take in all considerations/influences when analysing data or completing testing etc.
  • It is important to take on a collaborative approach to teaching as inquiry

Next steps:

– Begin to narrow down my own teaching as inquiry beginning by identifying my small group of priority learners.

Research:

(2014) H. Timperly, L. Kaser & J. Halbert. A framework for transforming learning in schools: Innovation and the spiral of inquiry. Centre for Strategic Education Seminar Series Paper No. 234, April 2014

 

Criteria this relates to:

Practicing Teacher Criteria 

1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,

Cultral Competencies 

4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,

Code of Ethics 

2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,

Key Competencies

1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

03/11/16 – SUMMARY: SIR PAUL CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY

Participating in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been incredibly valuable in advancing my knowledge in what it means to teach good science to students and why it is incredibly important. What largely impacted me was teaching science for citizenship. That teaching our ākonga the skills to think like scientist and will enable them to engage critically with the world around them. This is very important in today’s society where we are constantly surrounded to media and advertising that is often conflicting or attempting to seduce us into their way of thinking. The ability to think and act like a scientist is also important in order to adapt to our every changing world and to open doors for innovation and problem solving. I believe this has powerful potential to impact society and the future of Aotearoa in a very positive way. Is the science curriculum doing this?

The academy also broke down the science in the NZC and provided effective and powerful ways of teaching science using the science capabilities –

  • gather and interpret data
  • use evidence
  • critique evidence
  • interpret representations and
  • engage with science

and the 5E’s

  • engage,
  • explore,
  • explain,
  • elaborate
  • and evaluate.

This has been the most valuable PD I have every been on.

I have attached my notes from the conference which go further into the many ideas presented.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I am so glad that finally, someone from Cobham has been able to attend. I also note the focus on Science Capabilities that is something that has not been looked at by Cobham staff- only self via TRCC Science Conference and working with Science advisors at the early stages of this component of the NZC. As we know thinking and working like a scientist is a life skill and it is hoped that this conference and our EOSecology thinking will bring our Cobham students into closer relationships, share experiences and be aware of the many opportunities for careers connected to science. Hopefully, with your new curriculum content, tudents will gain greater awareness of the way science has such a place in our world. Thanks for appreciating and valuing this opportunity to attend the Academy and to then apply what you experienced to Cobham. Annie

– 03/11/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Pleased to hear that your participation in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been a worthwhile experience for you. It is great that you have used some of your learning from the Academy to inform out programmes here at Cobham. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 14/11/2016

03/11/16 – SIR PETER CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY DAY ONE

What?

PD for science – the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy

So what?

– Emotional engagement is fundamental to learning, is this prevalent in the current curriculum? Use more narratives/story telling. Socio-science – solve community problems etc.

– Are science tech and classroom science reinforcing each other? Are students making connections?

– Not to criticise the way we are thinking but to realised that we can mould the way we are working. Do not call it a fixed mindset. How do I think about science and what it is? Furthermore what correct and incorrect stereotypes do staff and students have about science?

Now what?

– Reflect on how I was taught science and how it has influenced my understanding of what it is. Ask myself what I think a scientist looks like and should be able to do. Make sure that I mould my understanding to be correct so that I pass this on to students.

– Establish a lesson for students where they explore what science is, how scientists think and what they do to contribute to society. In a way ‘re-educate’ students on their concept of science and make sure we are all on the same page. (To make sure that I build up the right idea on what a scientist does I am to be sure to do some reading around the area, discuss with other science educators and perhaps survey other staff.)

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

1 COMMENT

Annie Bowker said:

How I love what you are thinking. Scientists are often stereotyped and as we know the teaching of science was based on text book and with little opportunity to test the theory or experience for yourself working like a scientist. I’d love you to meet Julia Aitken for Australia and how she changed science in a rural NSW high school. To build what a scientist actually does is just how we hope our Living Lab will go- we can bring in scientists from all areas. I think we endeavor to bring out the ‘ awe and wonder’ but we still have to transfer this from the lab to the classroom.

– 03/11/2016

06/09/16 – TERM 3 WEEK 6

Highlights

– Cultural festival performance. It was an incredible feeling seeing the Kapa Haka group perform at the Cultural Festival – both Raegan and I were very very proud of all of the students. It was so rewarding to see all their hard work and ours come to fruition in such an energetic and enjoyable performance. We have received so much great feedback from parents from their achievements which are great to hear.

– Getting feedback from my students. As this week marked the end of tech cycle 4 and the beginning of tech cycle 5 I sent out a google form to get some feedback from the students. I also got some of the groups to give written feedback in class. It was great to hear what the students had to say – both feedback and feedforward. I really like to hear their opinion and always aim to make the changes that they suggest (within reason of course!). Here is a link to the surveys. Yr 8. Yr 7. The downside is that just under half of the students from each year level have responded.

– Feedback about the use of A3 SOLO sheets. I was able to ask the students in my survey if they preferred using the SOLO sheets or the booklets. Of those who completed the survey almost all of them preferred the booklets – 10/14 in fact. Though this may not be an accurate representation. Perhaps I should only focus on getting more thorough feedback from a focus group. This would be something to look at doing for the cycle 5 tech group. It would also be worth adding into the survey a section asking them to justify their answer.

– Having John Key visit the classroom. It was exciting for both the students and myself to have John Key come through the science classroom and see what we were doing.

– One big highlight that I am becoming more and more aware of as the year goes on is that teaching every student in the school really helps with whanaungatanga or building relationships and feeling part of the school community. I feel very privileged that I can walk through the school and know most of the students by name, have a real conversation with them that builds on the relationship we already have and be greeted by many of the students. It also helps when I take on extracurricular activities such as sport or Kapa Haka as I already have a positive relationship with many of the students which is key to behaviour management and setting up a positive and successful learning environment. It is also a great feeling walking into any classroom at the school and seeing familiar faces! This is important because as a tech teacher you can feel a bit separated from the rest of the classrooms/homerooms.

Challenges

Feedback forms. The issue I found with this is that just under half of the students from each year level have completed the form. This means that I may not have a true representation of what the students think about my teaching and science tech. Perhaps next time I need to send out the form a week before the final week to make sure that it is completed before they leave for the next rotation. I have sent an email to the classroom teachers of this rotation to ask them to remind them about the form but they already are very busy and I completely understand if it is not their priority.

Both a challenge and a highlight

Starting a new tech cycle. Firstly this is a challenge for two reasons. One – I am often a bit sad to see some of the groups go as you begin to really get to know them and how the class operates – their strengths and weaknesses and what works for them and what doesn’t. By this time you have also built some great relationships with the class and this really helps the flow of the lessons. Two – it is challenging to get to know all the new students and their names and quickly form a connection with them. The highlights that come from this, however, is that as this is the 5th time I have done this year it is becoming easier and easier. I am finding that my confidence has grown a lot and I am able to establish positive working relationships with the classrooms quite quickly. I am also getting very good at learning names fast! 🙂

Next week

Hail articles for Marae Trip and Kapa Haka

– Review SOLO entry slips completed by all the new classes

– Analyse results from google survey

– Begin reports for cycle 4 classes

Personal goals this relates to:
To implement 2016 Technology Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO engage priority and target students in assessing themselves. ,
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.,
Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO in Science Tech help improve the delivery of curriculum and student outcomes?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

Thanks Ronnie for continuing to demonstrate above and beyond commitment to our students and your own on going professional learning and practice. By being honest in your reflection about the challenges you have had recently and particularly the survey and the findings. When use of SOLO is the Technology Inquiry I guess this makes this even more challenging. Do you think it maybe because in science the SOLO rubric is taking them to the limit of thinking based on their at times introduction to the science idea and understanding? I find that sometimes when we are ‘ pushing’ students out of their comfort zone they choose to want to revert back to what they feel safe using and doing.

Looks like you have another busy week ahead and good luck for Tuesday night with your kapa haka group. Annie

– 06/09/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Another thoughtful post. Lots of highlights for you in science but also in the extra curricula activities you are associated with. You have reason to be very proud of the kapa haka performance. I’m biased of course, but I thought the Cobham items were the highlight of the show. I would be interested in catching up with you sometime soon to talk about the A3 SOLO sheets and how they are going. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 09/09/2016

28/07/16 – PĀNUI AKO

At the end of Term 2, I established Pānui Ako – the magazine at Cobham Intermediate for all things Māori-related. I published a number of articles including those about our Māori leaders. The Māori leaders have also been taken on board to help with the writing of articles for the magazine.

Criteria this relates to:
Cultural Competencies 
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

28/07/16 – HELPING STAFF WITH HAIL

After school on the 27th of July, I helped Brian with Hail and how it works. We uploaded photos and generated and published two articles about water polo for the school website.

 

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Key Competencies 
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

31/05/16 – HUI WITH MĀORI LEADERS AND PARENTS

What?

We had our first meeting on Tuesday 17th May with the student leaders, parents, and staff. We discussed what we wanted to achieve during the rest of the year. These included:

  • Marae visit
  • Hāngi

It was great to have an opportunity to meet and discuss as a group how we can develop māori learning as māori at school. It was good to see the young leaders begin to step into their position and to share their ideas. I do want to ensure that they have a good amount of responsibility and ownership during this process and that their ideas and thoughts are legitimised.

So what?

What do the leaders need/want? The idea is that some PD be provided for the students around Māori Tikanga, leadership etc. Maybe this is a way in which we can build the mana of these students?

Is there a possibility for the students to work with the Hauora Leaders? This was an idea brought up by one of the leaders.

Now what?

  • Have a brief meeting with leaders about when we can do a PD session? Ask them what they would like/if they have any ideas about this?
  • Set a date for the first PD session
  • Ensure that they leaders are connecting in with the student cultural group – email staff involved to see when the meetings are.
  • Discuss with the staff about the Hauora Group and if it would be appropriate for the Māori leaders to be a part of that.
Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages, and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Key Competencies 
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I can see that you are certainly wanting to assist the Māori leaders to make connections with other students and to feel valued. I wonder if we have any way that we could connect our current leaders to past Māori students from Cobham who are being successful in their chosen field of study, careers etc. The idea of networking as we as professionals do may provide our current leaders with part of what they have discussed.

– 31/05/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Veronica. It sounds like a very good beginning for this group. The next steps make sense to me. Tino pai! Cheers Pete

– 01/06/2016