03/11/16 – SUMMARY: SIR PAUL CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY

Participating in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been incredibly valuable in advancing my knowledge in what it means to teach good science to students and why it is incredibly important. What largely impacted me was teaching science for citizenship. That teaching our ākonga the skills to think like scientist and will enable them to engage critically with the world around them. This is very important in today’s society where we are constantly surrounded to media and advertising that is often conflicting or attempting to seduce us into their way of thinking. The ability to think and act like a scientist is also important in order to adapt to our every changing world and to open doors for innovation and problem solving. I believe this has powerful potential to impact society and the future of Aotearoa in a very positive way. Is the science curriculum doing this?

The academy also broke down the science in the NZC and provided effective and powerful ways of teaching science using the science capabilities –

  • gather and interpret data
  • use evidence
  • critique evidence
  • interpret representations and
  • engage with science

and the 5E’s

  • engage,
  • explore,
  • explain,
  • elaborate
  • and evaluate.

This has been the most valuable PD I have every been on.

I have attached my notes from the conference which go further into the many ideas presented.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I am so glad that finally, someone from Cobham has been able to attend. I also note the focus on Science Capabilities that is something that has not been looked at by Cobham staff- only self via TRCC Science Conference and working with Science advisors at the early stages of this component of the NZC. As we know thinking and working like a scientist is a life skill and it is hoped that this conference and our EOSecology thinking will bring our Cobham students into closer relationships, share experiences and be aware of the many opportunities for careers connected to science. Hopefully, with your new curriculum content, tudents will gain greater awareness of the way science has such a place in our world. Thanks for appreciating and valuing this opportunity to attend the Academy and to then apply what you experienced to Cobham. Annie

– 03/11/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Pleased to hear that your participation in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been a worthwhile experience for you. It is great that you have used some of your learning from the Academy to inform out programmes here at Cobham. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 14/11/2016

03/11/16 – TERM 4 WEEK 3

Highlights/challenges

– This week was the beginning of the final cycle in technology. It is both exciting and challenging meeting the new students. In order to build a good rapport with students quickly say my mihi and share a bit about myself, making connections and finding common ground. As the year has gone on I have become much more confident in doing this with the students and I enjoy being able to find commonality between us. When good relationships are established quickly I have noticed that engagement is much higher and classroom management is easier. I also find that the students are much more comfortable in the classroom and are willing to take risks. For some classes, this takes a bit longer than others. This could be an area to explore for the year 7’s in 2017. I look forward to seeing how already having a relationship with the 2017 Yr 8’s will impact the learning environment.

– I trialed some new lessons for the year 8’s around acids and bases and letting them explore in the lab. This freedom to explore really increases engagement and gets them thinking like scientists rather than following a list of instructions. It also helps break down the stereotype that there is always a ‘wrong’ and ‘right’ answer in science. Rather the thinking should be that whatever you observe happens as a result of your actions and scientists need to make connections between what they did and what they observed.

– I completed my self-appraisal. This has been great for giving me an opportunity to reflect on my classroom and find areas which I want to work on.

Next Steps

– Trial other lessons with the year 8’s – Air Rockets, Bunsen Burners/Combustion.

– Looking into Science Roadshow lessons and use the 5E’s and Science Capabilities.

– Put some thought into what works best as the first lesson for yr7’s and 8’s in order to ‘set the stage’ for science technology and to build effective relationships with ākonga.

Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultrual Competencies
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
Code of Ethics
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others

2 COMMENTS

Ann Lane said:

You are making great gains in all areas. I admire the way you are self assessing and reflecting on your daily practice.

Technology is also closely related in that trialling is part of the process. Making mistakes is part of the learning and often there is not a right or wrong answer.

Looking at the variables is important and working out why things have turned out the way they have is part of the process.

– 03/11/2016

Annie Bowker said:

I have no doubt that you are reflecting and evaluating as to what works best for learners and I congratulate you as a PRT to be focussed not just on your lessons but the way you seek to build relationships . You are constantly reviewing the programme and your implementation of the science lab lessons. I note that you have planned to allow year 8 students to have more ownership of their learning and that you have observed the increase in engagement. This observation is worth thinking about for 2017. Can year 7 get a lab licence and once this is achieved have more ownership and self direction around what they are investigating.

– 03/11/2016

28/07/16 – VISIT STAC

On Wednesday the 15th of June I visited STAC to learn about how they are incorporating SOLO into their science curriculum from Yr 7 – 11. I met with a number of teachers who shared with me their material and how they are using SOLO as a learning and assessment tool. They also shared the feedback that they have received from a number of students who have commented on the use of SOLO helping them to manage their learning and enabling them to identify their next steps.

This has given me insight into how I could effectively incorporate it into Cobham’s science curriculum.

Next steps:

– Use SOLO entry/exit slips for each topic of work (own knowledge, peer knowledge, and next steps). Will need to scaffold some classes more than others for this process. Perhaps have examples in place.

– Incorporate one SOLO activity into each unit of work, for eg a Describe ++ map, Hooks SOLO Hexagons etc. This is to be used for formative assessment.

Finally I want to slowly modify the booklets, as I have been doing, so that each activity correlates with SOLO. This will make it easier for both students and myself to monitor student learning and next steps.

Personal goals this relates to:
To implement 2016 Technology Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO engage priority and target students in assessing themselves. ,
Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO in Science Tech help improve the delivery of curriculum and student outcomes?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies 
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

3 COMMENTS

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Really pleased that you got some value out of your trip to STAC. They have some good practices going over there, don’t they. I think your next steps are all worthy from a curriculum perspective. Please don’t hesitate to let me know if you need a hand with any of your future SOLO initiatives. Keep up the open to learning mindset. Cheers Pete

– 28/07/2016

Annie Bowker said:

Great Ronnie I am so pleased that my suggestion to visit StAC was worthwhile for you. I think that you are well on the way when you note scaffolding- this means you are aware of the needs of all students.- inclusive tki and universal design for learning are other links worth checking out. I am more than willing to assist with you modifying the booklets as regular review is important. I am aware that for some strands not much has changed for awhile. Lately, I have been reading about the push for Nature of Science and career pathways that involve science. I wonder if there is an opportunity for us to integrate this into the booklets.

– 28/07/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Hi Annie, I would love your support in changing up the booklets – I agree, lets look at integrating the NoS into them as well. I have a number of ideas I would love to share with you.

– 29/07/2016

After school on the 27th of July, I helped Brian with Hail and how it works. We uploaded photos and generated and published two articles about water polo for the school website.

 

31/05/16 – HUI WITH MĀORI LEADERS AND PARENTS

What?

We had our first meeting on Tuesday 17th May with the student leaders, parents, and staff. We discussed what we wanted to achieve during the rest of the year. These included:

  • Marae visit
  • Hāngi

It was great to have an opportunity to meet and discuss as a group how we can develop māori learning as māori at school. It was good to see the young leaders begin to step into their position and to share their ideas. I do want to ensure that they have a good amount of responsibility and ownership during this process and that their ideas and thoughts are legitimised.

So what?

What do the leaders need/want? The idea is that some PD be provided for the students around Māori Tikanga, leadership etc. Maybe this is a way in which we can build the mana of these students?

Is there a possibility for the students to work with the Hauora Leaders? This was an idea brought up by one of the leaders.

Now what?

  • Have a brief meeting with leaders about when we can do a PD session? Ask them what they would like/if they have any ideas about this?
  • Set a date for the first PD session
  • Ensure that they leaders are connecting in with the student cultural group – email staff involved to see when the meetings are.
  • Discuss with the staff about the Hauora Group and if it would be appropriate for the Māori leaders to be a part of that.
Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages, and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Key Competencies 
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I can see that you are certainly wanting to assist the Māori leaders to make connections with other students and to feel valued. I wonder if we have any way that we could connect our current leaders to past Māori students from Cobham who are being successful in their chosen field of study, careers etc. The idea of networking as we as professionals do may provide our current leaders with part of what they have discussed.

– 31/05/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Veronica. It sounds like a very good beginning for this group. The next steps make sense to me. Tino pai! Cheers Pete

– 01/06/2016

PD – HOW TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE OUTCOMES FOR MĀORI, PASIFIKA AND MINORITIES … – 10/05/16

What?

This workshop was around how to significantly improve outcomes for Māori, Pasifika and minoritised (has been made to feel like the minority, does not have anything to do with numbers) students in our school community. It was grounded in evidence and practices that work in New Zealand school communities.

So what?

This workshop challenged me to critically review and evaluate my current practice and thinking. It urged me to consider what changes I could make to better improve the learning environment for Māori, Pasifika and minoritised students in my classroom and school. How do I identify minoritised students? or students who feel minoritised?

I am also challenged to consider if my practice is taking me down the deficit track, or if I am agentic (using power to make change) in my approach? How do I keep myself agentic?

The significance of whanaunatanga (relationships) to student achievement was also reiterated. I am challenged by this when I think about my unique setting as a Science Tech teacher where I have a large number of students over a very short amount of time. How can I best maintain and build an effective and authentic relationship with each of my students? Is there something that I could do at the beginning of every lesson to reconnect with each individual while keeping in mind the limited time that I have?

How to increase engagement with Māori, Pasifika and minoritised ākonga and whānau is also an area in which I gained some deeper insights. We were presented with these four categories – events, making connections, learning talk and systems and processes – as ways to increase engagement. I was challenged to restructure and reframe how we used each of these practices and what we want to achieve out of them. Meaningful change occurs when we engage with whānau and students around learning talk and systems and processes. This shares power and enables use to build connections between school and home life. This challenged me to think about how we can reframe events to use them as opportunities for learning talk and sharing systems and processes. For example, if a school was to hold a gala, situate this in a unit around financial literacy and get all the students running the gala. Parents are informed of how students are being assessed etc, and are encouraged to go to stalls asking questions (either their own or provided by the school) that support and encourage the development of their financial literacy.

Another example of this is Mutukaroa. The Mutukaroa programme is a process that fosters the active engagement of parents and whānau in learning partnerships and provides them with the tools and knowledge necessary to support the development of core skills in their children.

Ultimately this comes down to what is the difference between someone being INVOLVED vs ENGAGED. This really hit home for me and has challenged me to think about how I can be more agentic and focus on authentic engagement rather than involvement. Of course again I am challenged with my context of being a science tech teacher, so how can I do this in my classroom?

Here are some notes and here is the slideshow presentation.

Now what?

These are some next steps to take what I have learnt back into my school and classroom setting.

  • Have some peer observations done that focus around being my practice being deficit or agentic orientated.
  • Do some research around relationship building games that are quick and try some out in my classroom. Perhaps set up a new routine for how we start each science lesson that involves some relationship building or space to reconnect as a class.
  • To get whānau engaged over involved, perhaps I could, at the beginning of each cycle, ask the students if any of their parents are trained in any area of science and if they were willing to come into the science lab to share/show/help etc.
  • In any future events that I am apart of, making sure that I am aware which of my students will be there and if there parent are around perhaps strike up a meaningful conversation around their students learning and see if the are aware of the systems and processes in place. etc. Perhaps I should discuss if/how to do this with leadership or more experienced teachers.
  • Finally to take on board the 5 things a teacher needs to be and the 5 best ways to promote learning (see notes) that were shared with use. My first step in this regard will be to increase the amount of feedback and feed-forward that I give to ākonga that is NOT focussed on behaviour but rather learning orientated. Perhaps I could have an observation around this so that I have clear evidence of what I am doing.
Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Tamara Bell said:

Great summary of what was a really engaging hui, it was awesome to see and read how much you got out of the day and what learnings and next steps you have now identified. So much so, I copied lots of your notes to add to my own reflection on the same kaupapa! Ngā mihi nui 🙂 I really like the three step framework of What, So What and Now What to structure your thinking and ensure you are covering the reflection and next steps process, ka mau te wehi!

– 11/05/2016

PRIMARY PCT WORKSHOP 1 – 05/05/16

This was a PCT and Mentor Workshop day provided by Mau Ki Te Ako on the 5th April 2016.

This briefly went over the requirements (PTC’s) that need to met by a beginning teacher in order to gain your registration. It then went deeper into the Teaching as Inquiry (TAI) process and how it is implemented. We were able to share our inquiries with fellow teachers and discuss any tips, challenges or ideas. We were also able to share some resources that we found useful for teaching and learning.

I now have a clearer understanding of how I can ensure that I am meeting the PTC’s and the type of evidence I should be collecting and were best to store it. I also have a better insight into how to conduct my inquiry.

I came away deciding that I need to simplify my inquiry and develop a clearer outline as to where I am heading. Furthermore to find an effective way to document this – most likely through appraisal connector like I am already doing.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Thanks for posting. Yes maybe the next step is for you and me to get together and have a chat about where you T@I is sitting and what might need adjusting etc. Next week sometime? Cheers Pete

– 06/05/2016

USING ZAPTION – 11/04/16

I have been doing some research around different digital apps that I can use in the science curriculum and I came across Zaption.

Zaption…….’transforms video-based learning with interactive content and tools that engage learners, deepen understanding, and track progress. Teachers, trainers and instructional designers use Zaption to quickly add images, text, and questions to existing online videos. Share lessons with individuals to watch on their own, or watch together with Zaption Presenter. With Zaption’s Analytics, instructors get immediate feedback on how viewers interact with content and understand key concepts.’

I have trialled it with all my classes so far and the feedback has been very positive. The students have loved using this app and I find that they are very engaged with the learning. It also helps me with tracking each of my students as it gives me instant feedback on how they are going. I would highly recommend this to all teachers to give it a go! I am now looking at making more of my own Zaption videos to meet the needs of my lessons.

At the moment I am only on the free version which limits the amount of data that you get (you can only see how five students are tracking). For $8 a month you can upgrade and have access to all the settings which lets you track all of the students. Something that I will most likely do.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others

3 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I discovered Zaption at the 2015 library conference and one keynote speaker talked about libraries and maker spaces. I am not the digital expert who could use it. This shows you are using SAMR model in your lab classes. Do you need to get the dollars from the science budget? Great to see you matching this to the criteria. I especially like the idea of Zaption as being another alternative assessment tool.

– 11/04/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Thanks for your comment Annie. You could definitely use it, it is easier than you think. I would be happy to show you. I feel it would be appropriate to use the money from the science budget, that would be great.

– 12/04/2016

Tamara Bell said:

Agree – I am a huge fan of Zaption and it is great to hear you are using it in the science lab. Everytime I have seen it used the engagement and interaction from children increases a great deal so exciting stuff Veronica – karawhiua!

– 12/04/2016