28/07/16 – HELPING STAFF WITH HAIL

After school on the 27th of July, I helped Brian with Hail and how it works. We uploaded photos and generated and published two articles about water polo for the school website.

 

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Key Competencies 
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing
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31/05/16 – HUI WITH MĀORI LEADERS AND PARENTS

What?

We had our first meeting on Tuesday 17th May with the student leaders, parents, and staff. We discussed what we wanted to achieve during the rest of the year. These included:

  • Marae visit
  • Hāngi

It was great to have an opportunity to meet and discuss as a group how we can develop māori learning as māori at school. It was good to see the young leaders begin to step into their position and to share their ideas. I do want to ensure that they have a good amount of responsibility and ownership during this process and that their ideas and thoughts are legitimised.

So what?

What do the leaders need/want? The idea is that some PD be provided for the students around Māori Tikanga, leadership etc. Maybe this is a way in which we can build the mana of these students?

Is there a possibility for the students to work with the Hauora Leaders? This was an idea brought up by one of the leaders.

Now what?

  • Have a brief meeting with leaders about when we can do a PD session? Ask them what they would like/if they have any ideas about this?
  • Set a date for the first PD session
  • Ensure that they leaders are connecting in with the student cultural group – email staff involved to see when the meetings are.
  • Discuss with the staff about the Hauora Group and if it would be appropriate for the Māori leaders to be a part of that.
Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau, and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity, and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages, and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Key Competencies 
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I can see that you are certainly wanting to assist the Māori leaders to make connections with other students and to feel valued. I wonder if we have any way that we could connect our current leaders to past Māori students from Cobham who are being successful in their chosen field of study, careers etc. The idea of networking as we as professionals do may provide our current leaders with part of what they have discussed.

– 31/05/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Veronica. It sounds like a very good beginning for this group. The next steps make sense to me. Tino pai! Cheers Pete

– 01/06/2016

PD – HOW TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE OUTCOMES FOR MĀORI, PASIFIKA AND MINORITIES … – 10/05/16

What?

This workshop was around how to significantly improve outcomes for Māori, Pasifika and minoritised (has been made to feel like the minority, does not have anything to do with numbers) students in our school community. It was grounded in evidence and practices that work in New Zealand school communities.

So what?

This workshop challenged me to critically review and evaluate my current practice and thinking. It urged me to consider what changes I could make to better improve the learning environment for Māori, Pasifika and minoritised students in my classroom and school. How do I identify minoritised students? or students who feel minoritised?

I am also challenged to consider if my practice is taking me down the deficit track, or if I am agentic (using power to make change) in my approach? How do I keep myself agentic?

The significance of whanaunatanga (relationships) to student achievement was also reiterated. I am challenged by this when I think about my unique setting as a Science Tech teacher where I have a large number of students over a very short amount of time. How can I best maintain and build an effective and authentic relationship with each of my students? Is there something that I could do at the beginning of every lesson to reconnect with each individual while keeping in mind the limited time that I have?

How to increase engagement with Māori, Pasifika and minoritised ākonga and whānau is also an area in which I gained some deeper insights. We were presented with these four categories – events, making connections, learning talk and systems and processes – as ways to increase engagement. I was challenged to restructure and reframe how we used each of these practices and what we want to achieve out of them. Meaningful change occurs when we engage with whānau and students around learning talk and systems and processes. This shares power and enables use to build connections between school and home life. This challenged me to think about how we can reframe events to use them as opportunities for learning talk and sharing systems and processes. For example, if a school was to hold a gala, situate this in a unit around financial literacy and get all the students running the gala. Parents are informed of how students are being assessed etc, and are encouraged to go to stalls asking questions (either their own or provided by the school) that support and encourage the development of their financial literacy.

Another example of this is Mutukaroa. The Mutukaroa programme is a process that fosters the active engagement of parents and whānau in learning partnerships and provides them with the tools and knowledge necessary to support the development of core skills in their children.

Ultimately this comes down to what is the difference between someone being INVOLVED vs ENGAGED. This really hit home for me and has challenged me to think about how I can be more agentic and focus on authentic engagement rather than involvement. Of course again I am challenged with my context of being a science tech teacher, so how can I do this in my classroom?

Here are some notes and here is the slideshow presentation.

Now what?

These are some next steps to take what I have learnt back into my school and classroom setting.

  • Have some peer observations done that focus around being my practice being deficit or agentic orientated.
  • Do some research around relationship building games that are quick and try some out in my classroom. Perhaps set up a new routine for how we start each science lesson that involves some relationship building or space to reconnect as a class.
  • To get whānau engaged over involved, perhaps I could, at the beginning of each cycle, ask the students if any of their parents are trained in any area of science and if they were willing to come into the science lab to share/show/help etc.
  • In any future events that I am apart of, making sure that I am aware which of my students will be there and if there parent are around perhaps strike up a meaningful conversation around their students learning and see if the are aware of the systems and processes in place. etc. Perhaps I should discuss if/how to do this with leadership or more experienced teachers.
  • Finally to take on board the 5 things a teacher needs to be and the 5 best ways to promote learning (see notes) that were shared with use. My first step in this regard will be to increase the amount of feedback and feed-forward that I give to ākonga that is NOT focussed on behaviour but rather learning orientated. Perhaps I could have an observation around this so that I have clear evidence of what I am doing.
Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Tamara Bell said:

Great summary of what was a really engaging hui, it was awesome to see and read how much you got out of the day and what learnings and next steps you have now identified. So much so, I copied lots of your notes to add to my own reflection on the same kaupapa! Ngā mihi nui 🙂 I really like the three step framework of What, So What and Now What to structure your thinking and ensure you are covering the reflection and next steps process, ka mau te wehi!

– 11/05/2016

PRIMARY PCT WORKSHOP 1 – 05/05/16

This was a PCT and Mentor Workshop day provided by Mau Ki Te Ako on the 5th April 2016.

This briefly went over the requirements (PTC’s) that need to met by a beginning teacher in order to gain your registration. It then went deeper into the Teaching as Inquiry (TAI) process and how it is implemented. We were able to share our inquiries with fellow teachers and discuss any tips, challenges or ideas. We were also able to share some resources that we found useful for teaching and learning.

I now have a clearer understanding of how I can ensure that I am meeting the PTC’s and the type of evidence I should be collecting and were best to store it. I also have a better insight into how to conduct my inquiry.

I came away deciding that I need to simplify my inquiry and develop a clearer outline as to where I am heading. Furthermore to find an effective way to document this – most likely through appraisal connector like I am already doing.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
Cultural Competencies 
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics 
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Thanks for posting. Yes maybe the next step is for you and me to get together and have a chat about where you T@I is sitting and what might need adjusting etc. Next week sometime? Cheers Pete

– 06/05/2016

DISCUSSION ABOUT MOVING TO A MLE – 11/04/16

I had an interesting discussion with Brian and Pauline about how as a school we are moving to MLE and what this would look like in the technology department. We discussed a number of ideas about how we could trial having a shared learning environment. Perhasps between Science and Hard Materials and also between Science and Sowing. We spoke about the areas in which out curriculum overlap and how combining classes for one or two lessons could be very beneficial for student learning. It would also provide and opportunity for us to learn from each other as teachers and perhaps lead to an enriched and integrated techonology curriculum. We also discussed how this could be a huge strength for having neighbouring technology blocks and is an advantage that we could exploit further.

What now?

We will give it some thought, do some research and perhaps this will form an inquiry which we could complete in the coming term. We would start off very simple by combining one or two lessons.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

An interesting point raised. Have any of you had an opportunity to visit schools to see how these work. It certainly could lead to further student choice as students have access to other areas for things such as fair testing, making models to show there understanding.

– 11/04/2016

Pauline Smythe said:

This has been a very valuable conversation and I’m already starting to think about the possible ways we could integrate the science and technology curricula, especially in the area of electronics. I have a couple of simple projects in mind that blend electronics and soft materials, using conductive thread to sew a simple circuit. Definitely keen to trial these in cycle 4 when Yr 7 students will arrive will in science already possessing the stitching skills needed from their time in fabric technology.

– 13/04/2016

HUI WHAKATAU 2/03/2016

What:

I attended the hui whakatau, a meeting between teachers and ākonga and their whānau who identify as Māori. We began by introducing ourselves, either in Te Reo or in English, then we presented an overview of Māori student success at Cobham. This was followed by a discussion session where ākonga and whānau could share ideas about what would help them succeed at Cobham. The hui concluded with some shared kai.

So what:

I found that the Whānau Māori Hui was a valuable opportunity for whānau and ākonga to share with Cobham staff what they thought would help them to be successful at Cobham. This is vital as they know what is best to help ākonga to succeed as Māori and also gives them ownership over their (or their child’s) learning. It also helped establish, or build on, whanaungatanga and develop a sense of community between all parties. I was challenged by the low numbers that we had and made me question why that might be? It inspired me to think of how we could work towards strengthening the Māori/cultural community in the school in a way that is ākonga and whānau led.

Next steps:

Discuss with colleagues about what they got out of the hui and their understandings.

Apply to take on the Māori unit and begin to collect and implement some of the ideas that were shared at the hui.

Personal goals this relates to:
School Wide Goal 2016 – Cobham teachers and leaders will use the Tātaiako competencies of wānanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, tangata whenuatanga and ako to ensure their teaching/leadership behaviours and practice are about knowing, respecting and working successfully with Māori learners, whānau and iwi.
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
3 – Demonstrate commitment to bicultural partnership in Aotearoa New Zealand.,
7 – Promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment.,
10 – Work effectively within the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community.,
3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture.,
4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
2 – Relating to Others,
4 – Participating and Contributing

 

Comments:

Annie Bowker said:

Well done you for taking the step to build your professional kete by putting yourself forward to apply for the unit.It makes sense to have a staff member who is passionate about Māori learning as Māori. You are building relationships with both students and whanau through your kapa haka leadership. I also feel that someone from another cultural background other than Pakeha is able to relate to the idea’ of walking in someone else’s shoes . My past experiences also tell me that a North Islander ( sorry ) seems to have more understanding of the culture and tikanaga than we do . The indicators to date are, 1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement., the hui 2 – Whanaungatanga – Actively engaging in respectful working relationships with Māori learners, parents and whānau, hapū, iwi and the Māori Community., kapa haka and the connections. 3 – Manaakitanga – Showing integrity, sincerity and respect towards Māori beliefs, languages and culture., prior experience and a willingness to embrace the culture 4 – Tangata Whenuatanga – Affirming Māori learners as Māori. Providing contexts for learning where the language, identity and culture of Māori learners and their whānau are affirmed., your comments in your reflection. 5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,

– 22/03/2016     (Private)

COBHAM STAFF INQUIRY MEETING 7/03/16

This was a staff meeting to share the progress of our inquiries. We filled out a staff shared document with an update of our inquiries. It has provided a platform which we can use to communicate about our inquiries. I need to continue to plan out and implement our/my inquiry.

Remember: need to make sure I am working with colleagues.

Next steps: Is there anyone else who is doing a similar inquiry to mine?

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How does the use of SOLO in Science Tech help improve the delivery of curriculum and student outcomes?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies 
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing