08/12/16 – SLH WEBINAR – MAKING SENSE OF WHAT WE SEE

What: Interactive webinar about making sense of our observations and using them to make inferences.

How science works: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/embeds/50-how-science-works

Mystery box interactive: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/430-observation-and-the-mystery-box

New activity: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/1400-observation-learning-to-see

Observation activity – Image on site is here; https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/images/391-red-tide

What is the difference between observation and inference? A way of gathering background knowledge. Interest and how much they know. Give students time and practice about what they are doing. Build on curiosity.

The Hub has a number of teacher resources on alternative conceptions that students might hold: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/?search=true&query=alternative+conceptions

An example of a teacher using a simple activity to shift a student’s understanding of science. http://sciencelearn.org.nz/Teacher-Ideas/Hubs-in-Action/Phenomenally-great-information

Optical illusions – everyone can interpret and see information etc in a slightly different way. Do you see what I see? Test this with a tool – realise that they are straight lines.

Awareness test – look out for cyclists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5YvyDlmz9o

https://nz.pinterest.com/nzsciencelearn/observation-in-science/

So what?

How can I use this in the new curriculum for next year?

What activities are appropriate for level 3/4?

Now what?

Explore the resources at a greater depth and implement it.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
Code of Ethics 
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

Thanks Veronica for joining up for this webinar at such a mayhem time of year. I think that some of these activities would be useful for science capabilities and SOLO. Perhaps even as tracking assessment. I just wish we had more time to explore the Hub. Annie

– 09/12/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Vernonica. Sound like an interesting session. Will be interested to hear how it goes next year when you give some of these things a try.

Cheers

Pete

– 12/12/2016

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03/11/16 – SUMMARY: SIR PAUL CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY

Participating in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been incredibly valuable in advancing my knowledge in what it means to teach good science to students and why it is incredibly important. What largely impacted me was teaching science for citizenship. That teaching our ākonga the skills to think like scientist and will enable them to engage critically with the world around them. This is very important in today’s society where we are constantly surrounded to media and advertising that is often conflicting or attempting to seduce us into their way of thinking. The ability to think and act like a scientist is also important in order to adapt to our every changing world and to open doors for innovation and problem solving. I believe this has powerful potential to impact society and the future of Aotearoa in a very positive way. Is the science curriculum doing this?

The academy also broke down the science in the NZC and provided effective and powerful ways of teaching science using the science capabilities –

  • gather and interpret data
  • use evidence
  • critique evidence
  • interpret representations and
  • engage with science

and the 5E’s

  • engage,
  • explore,
  • explain,
  • elaborate
  • and evaluate.

This has been the most valuable PD I have every been on.

I have attached my notes from the conference which go further into the many ideas presented.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I am so glad that finally, someone from Cobham has been able to attend. I also note the focus on Science Capabilities that is something that has not been looked at by Cobham staff- only self via TRCC Science Conference and working with Science advisors at the early stages of this component of the NZC. As we know thinking and working like a scientist is a life skill and it is hoped that this conference and our EOSecology thinking will bring our Cobham students into closer relationships, share experiences and be aware of the many opportunities for careers connected to science. Hopefully, with your new curriculum content, tudents will gain greater awareness of the way science has such a place in our world. Thanks for appreciating and valuing this opportunity to attend the Academy and to then apply what you experienced to Cobham. Annie

– 03/11/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Ronnie. Pleased to hear that your participation in the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy has been a worthwhile experience for you. It is great that you have used some of your learning from the Academy to inform out programmes here at Cobham. Keep up the great work. Cheers Pete

– 14/11/2016

03/11/16 – SIR PETER CALLAGHAN SCIENCE ACADEMY DAY ONE

What?

PD for science – the Sir Paul Callaghan Science Academy

So what?

– Emotional engagement is fundamental to learning, is this prevalent in the current curriculum? Use more narratives/story telling. Socio-science – solve community problems etc.

– Are science tech and classroom science reinforcing each other? Are students making connections?

– Not to criticise the way we are thinking but to realised that we can mould the way we are working. Do not call it a fixed mindset. How do I think about science and what it is? Furthermore what correct and incorrect stereotypes do staff and students have about science?

Now what?

– Reflect on how I was taught science and how it has influenced my understanding of what it is. Ask myself what I think a scientist looks like and should be able to do. Make sure that I mould my understanding to be correct so that I pass this on to students.

– Establish a lesson for students where they explore what science is, how scientists think and what they do to contribute to society. In a way ‘re-educate’ students on their concept of science and make sure we are all on the same page. (To make sure that I build up the right idea on what a scientist does I am to be sure to do some reading around the area, discuss with other science educators and perhaps survey other staff.)

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies 
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
3 – Key Competencies – Thinking

1 COMMENT

Annie Bowker said:

How I love what you are thinking. Scientists are often stereotyped and as we know the teaching of science was based on text book and with little opportunity to test the theory or experience for yourself working like a scientist. I’d love you to meet Julia Aitken for Australia and how she changed science in a rural NSW high school. To build what a scientist actually does is just how we hope our Living Lab will go- we can bring in scientists from all areas. I think we endeavor to bring out the ‘ awe and wonder’ but we still have to transfer this from the lab to the classroom.

– 03/11/2016

DISCUSSION ABOUT MOVING TO A MLE – 11/04/16

I had an interesting discussion with Brian and Pauline about how as a school we are moving to MLE and what this would look like in the technology department. We discussed a number of ideas about how we could trial having a shared learning environment. Perhasps between Science and Hard Materials and also between Science and Sowing. We spoke about the areas in which out curriculum overlap and how combining classes for one or two lessons could be very beneficial for student learning. It would also provide and opportunity for us to learn from each other as teachers and perhaps lead to an enriched and integrated techonology curriculum. We also discussed how this could be a huge strength for having neighbouring technology blocks and is an advantage that we could exploit further.

What now?

We will give it some thought, do some research and perhaps this will form an inquiry which we could complete in the coming term. We would start off very simple by combining one or two lessons.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self,
Key Competencies
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others,
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

An interesting point raised. Have any of you had an opportunity to visit schools to see how these work. It certainly could lead to further student choice as students have access to other areas for things such as fair testing, making models to show there understanding.

– 11/04/2016

Pauline Smythe said:

This has been a very valuable conversation and I’m already starting to think about the possible ways we could integrate the science and technology curricula, especially in the area of electronics. I have a couple of simple projects in mind that blend electronics and soft materials, using conductive thread to sew a simple circuit. Definitely keen to trial these in cycle 4 when Yr 7 students will arrive will in science already possessing the stitching skills needed from their time in fabric technology.

– 13/04/2016

PD – DIVE INTO POND WITH THE SCIENCE LEARNING HUB – 03/03/16

Annie and I completed a professional development course through Science Learning Hub Conference Room about Pond. In Pond, you can discover and share resources, knowledge and experiences within a supportive and generous environment solely focussed on teaching and learning. Pond hosts resources from numerous different sources.

  • It is a search engine that uniquely services kiwi classrooms and can connect you with a number of different New Zealand resources.
  • Enables teachers to share important and valuable resources.
  • You can easily collect resources and organise them.
  • Social network platform for teachers to share valuable resources.

Wonderings:

  • Can I get akonga to use this resource successfully?

Next steps:

  • Find useful resources and to stay connected with what is going on in the teaching world.
  • Build up a number of resources or ‘buckets’ and connect/follow different leaders in my curriculum area.
Criteria this relates to:
PTC’s
1 – Establish and maintain effective professional relationships focused on the learning and well-being of akonga.,
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
Cultural Competencies
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
1 – Managing Self,
2 – Relating to Others,
3 – Thinking,
4  – Participating and Contributing

1 COMMENT

Scott Thelning said:

Thanks for doing the PD. I must admit that I need to delve more into this…I’ve heard of it, know what it is in general terms, but that’s about it. I suspect it is pretty awesome! There weren’t things like this when I began teaching…make the most f it!

– 16/03/2016

TECH ANGELS MEETING 25/02/16

This is the post excerpt.

I attended the first Tech Angels meeting and came away very impressed and inspired. It is clear that the use of technology is a tool that has huge potential to revolutionise the learning environment. I had a brief discussion with colleagues after the meeting and I came away with a number of observations and challenges.

Observations (What?):

  • Many akonga have skills and talents that are often not ‘exposed’ or ‘tapped into’ in the traditional learning environment.
  • It is interesting to note the learning environment that can evolve when akonga are given ownership, choice and responsibility.
  • The topic or context around which learning takes place hugely impacts on the learning environment. i.e. relatable, relevant, etc.

Challenges (So what?):

  • How do I conceptualise learning and the learning environment? Is it very ‘traditional’ or do I allow akonga to explore, connect and develop ideas freely? Do I challenge them to think or do I ‘feed’ them the knowledge?
  • How can I incorporate the use of devices in the science lab to revolutionise the learning space and really become a facilitator to learning, rather than a driver or director of learning?
    • further what impact could this have on akonga ability to self manage and develop intrinsic motivation?
  • Can my classroom become paper free? Is this a good idea? Are there negative impacts on learning for this?
  • How do I effectively use devices in the classroom for learning when all akonga have different levels of ability? And how much time can I spend teaching this when, as a science tech teacher, I have limited amount of teaching time with akonga?

Next steps (Now what?):

  • Begin an inquiry around digitalising the science curriculum and the impact on learning.
  • Research other science teachers who have effectively digitalised their curriculum.
  • Continue to attend Tech Angels meeting (and others) to further develop my own skills and knowledge.
  • Read some of the research around MLE that constantly use devices and identify the pros and cons.
  • Check the availability of suitable devices for use in the science lab. Do I have enough?
  • Begin to plan how I could digitalised the science curriculum.

Criteria this relates to:

PTC’s 
4 – Demonstrate commitment to on-going professional learning and development of personal professional practice.,
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
7 – Promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment.,
9 – Respond effectively to the diverse language and cultural experiences, and the varied strengths, interests and needs of individuals and groups of akonga.,

Code of Ethics 
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others
4 – Truth – to be honest with others and self

Key Competencies 
2 – Relating to others
3 – Thinking

Tamara Bell said:

Great first reflection Veronica – it is really exciting to see you inspired by the mad skills our tamariki have and begin thinking about the implications this has on your own teaching practice. I look forward to seeing your inquiry develop further and what gains our kids will have from your new learning. Kia kaha!

– 29/02/2016   

Scott Thelning said:

I’m so excited as the Principal to read your reflections and thoughts. Your questions are meaningful, well considered and could lead you to some great outcomes! We talked about these students and it is frightening how much we are potentially numbing them to bits in our classes. Great job.

– 16/03/2016