08/12/16 – SLH WEBINAR – MAKING SENSE OF WHAT WE SEE

What: Interactive webinar about making sense of our observations and using them to make inferences.

How science works: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/embeds/50-how-science-works

Mystery box interactive: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/430-observation-and-the-mystery-box

New activity: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/1400-observation-learning-to-see

Observation activity – Image on site is here; https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/images/391-red-tide

What is the difference between observation and inference? A way of gathering background knowledge. Interest and how much they know. Give students time and practice about what they are doing. Build on curiosity.

The Hub has a number of teacher resources on alternative conceptions that students might hold: https://beta.sciencelearn.org.nz/?search=true&query=alternative+conceptions

An example of a teacher using a simple activity to shift a student’s understanding of science. http://sciencelearn.org.nz/Teacher-Ideas/Hubs-in-Action/Phenomenally-great-information

Optical illusions – everyone can interpret and see information etc in a slightly different way. Do you see what I see? Test this with a tool – realise that they are straight lines.

Awareness test – look out for cyclists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5YvyDlmz9o

https://nz.pinterest.com/nzsciencelearn/observation-in-science/

So what?

How can I use this in the new curriculum for next year?

What activities are appropriate for level 3/4?

Now what?

Explore the resources at a greater depth and implement it.

Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria
5 – Show leadership that contributes to effective teaching and learning,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
Code of Ethics 
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
4 – Key Competencies – Participating and Contributing

2 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

Thanks Veronica for joining up for this webinar at such a mayhem time of year. I think that some of these activities would be useful for science capabilities and SOLO. Perhaps even as tracking assessment. I just wish we had more time to explore the Hub. Annie

– 09/12/2016

Peter Fowler said:

Hi Vernonica. Sound like an interesting session. Will be interested to hear how it goes next year when you give some of these things a try.

Cheers

Pete

– 12/12/2016

USING ZAPTION – 11/04/16

I have been doing some research around different digital apps that I can use in the science curriculum and I came across Zaption.

Zaption…….’transforms video-based learning with interactive content and tools that engage learners, deepen understanding, and track progress. Teachers, trainers and instructional designers use Zaption to quickly add images, text, and questions to existing online videos. Share lessons with individuals to watch on their own, or watch together with Zaption Presenter. With Zaption’s Analytics, instructors get immediate feedback on how viewers interact with content and understand key concepts.’

I have trialled it with all my classes so far and the feedback has been very positive. The students have loved using this app and I find that they are very engaged with the learning. It also helps me with tracking each of my students as it gives me instant feedback on how they are going. I would highly recommend this to all teachers to give it a go! I am now looking at making more of my own Zaption videos to meet the needs of my lessons.

At the moment I am only on the free version which limits the amount of data that you get (you can only see how five students are tracking). For $8 a month you can upgrade and have access to all the settings which lets you track all of the students. Something that I will most likely do.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
2 – Demonstrate commitment to promoting the well-being of all akonga.,
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
12 – Use critical inquiry and problem-solving effectively in their professional practice,
Cultural Competencies
1 – Wānanga – Participating with learners and communities in robust dialogue for the benefit of Māori learners’ achievement.,
5 – Ako – Taking responsibility for their own learning and that of Māori learners.,
Code of Ethics
1 – Autonomy – to treat people with rights that are to be honoured and defended,
2 – Justice – to share power and prevent the abuse of power,
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others,
Key Competencies
1 – Key Competencies – Managing Self,
2 – Key Competencies – Relating to Others

3 COMMENTS

Annie Bowker said:

I discovered Zaption at the 2015 library conference and one keynote speaker talked about libraries and maker spaces. I am not the digital expert who could use it. This shows you are using SAMR model in your lab classes. Do you need to get the dollars from the science budget? Great to see you matching this to the criteria. I especially like the idea of Zaption as being another alternative assessment tool.

– 11/04/2016

Veronica Noetzli said:

Thanks for your comment Annie. You could definitely use it, it is easier than you think. I would be happy to show you. I feel it would be appropriate to use the money from the science budget, that would be great.

– 12/04/2016

Tamara Bell said:

Agree – I am a huge fan of Zaption and it is great to hear you are using it in the science lab. Everytime I have seen it used the engagement and interaction from children increases a great deal so exciting stuff Veronica – karawhiua!

– 12/04/2016

USING GOOGLE DOCS – 05/04/16

In the last tech cycle I got ākonga in my focus group to use google docs to record their learning during the lesson. I used two different approaches. The first one I created the document and saved it to their Tech Science folder. In the second approach I got ākonga to create the document and required headings etc themselves.

Successes for both approaches included increased engagement from ākonga, greater attention to what they were recording and it resulted in a clear record of their learning. An additional success for the getting ākonga to create their own document was that it enabled them to take more ownership of their learning and the freedom to choose the format of how they wanted to record their learning.

Challenges that were shared across both approaches included that not all students were very efficient at locating or creating the document in their tech science folder. Some students were slower to type than others and did not have the same level of digital literacy. Additional challenges for the second approach included that not all ākonga saved their document in the correct folder which meant that when I went to mark it I had to find it. Further, giving them the freedom to choose the format for recording their learning meant that when marking or leaving comments I have to respond to a diverse range of note taking which becomes more time consuming.

One of the biggest challenges is for me as a teacher going through and marking their work. This becomes very time consuming. Opening the documents and leaving comments can take some time. Perhaps it is not necessary for me to mark every piece of work that they do, but them how am I to ensure that they are completing the task to the desired level?

The next step would be fore me to use google docs in combination with other digital learning tools such as google forms or Hapara workspaces to see if this can provide a virtual learning hub that is both effective and efficient for learning and for monitoring/assessing and marking learning.

Personal goals this relates to:
Inquiry: How can digital technologies be used in science technology to increase student engagement and learning?
Criteria this relates to:
Practicing Teacher Criteria 
6 – Conceptualise, plan and implement an appropriate learning programme.,
7 – Promote a collaborative, inclusive and supportive learning environment.,
8 – Demonstrate in practice their knowledge and understanding of how akonga learn,
11 – Analyse and appropriately use assessment information, which has been gathered formally and informally,
Code of Ethics
3 – Responsible care – to do good and minimise harm to others

1 COMMENT

Annie Bowker said:

I think you are right reflecting on other digital learning tools options. I am wondering if in fact arbs- assessment resource bank and digistore may be worth exploring. As you know I am familiar with these resources but not in the context of a digital workspace. Happy to share my ideas with you as you are the tech wizard. This is one of the on going challenges we have when it comes to students across a range of levels and digital literacy. Have you checked out any of the UDL sites- universal design for learning. If you were to use SOLO as you are could you have students do some of the self assessment. If you like we could perhaps arrange for you to meet a science teacher at StAC as they use SOLO across all curriculums.

– 05/04/2016